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How Quitting Facebook Helped Relieve My Depression And Made Me A Better Friend



By Vanessa Rasanen - Posted at The Federalist:

At first, quitting Facebook was insanely difficult. I had been on Facebook since its inception, and developed social habits centered on the platform.

Social media can help foster friendships and keep us connected to loved ones. When people insisted it couldn’t replace face-to-face, in-person conversation, I scoffed, responding with anecdotes of how many of my friends needed it to keep in touch when the military moved them from place to place.

When folks warned that social media was likely exacerbating my depression, I shook my head, pointing to my support just a click away. When my husband suggested I spent too much time on my accounts and should consider deactivating, I insisted I needed the outlet for an escape from the stress of work and home, of life in general.

But no more. I’m over it. I’m done.

My husband had indeed been encouraging me to consider ditching social media — Facebook specifically — for years, especially after my postpartum depression. But he would always concede when I gave the above reasons for needing to stay.

Then one day my depression hit a new low, sending my mind whirling with thoughts of driving my car off an overpass to spare my family the hassle of having me failing them all the time. I realized something had to give. I was on medication, in counseling, and still struggling. I needed to do whatever I could for my mental health. So I took my husband’s advice, and left.

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Previously Featured Posts

Bill Hybels Resigns from Willow Creek

By Bob Smietana - Posted at Christianity Today:
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Bill Hybels has stepped down as senior pastor of Willow Creek Community Church, the Chicago-area megachurch he founded over 40 years ago, citing the controversy over recent allegations against him.

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By Dr. R. Scott Clark - Posted at The Heidelblog:

Racism is sin. There can be no hedging or qualifying here. To regard another image bearer as inferior because of his ethnicity is sin and has no place in the church of Jesus Christ. God’s Word is clear about the only remedy for racism: the good news of Jesus Christ.
But before faith came, we were kept in custody under the law, being shut up to the faith which was later to be revealed. Therefore the Law has become our tutor to lead us to Christ, so that we may be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a tutor. For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. For all of you who were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s descendants, heirs according to promise. (Galatians 3:23–29; NASB). N…

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