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Showing posts from June, 2017

Idolatry, Demons, and Ecumenism

By Mike Riccardi - Posted at The Cripplegate:


Whom can the faithful church of God legitimately partner with in ministry? That question has been a point of contention among professing Christians for the past 100 years. And that’s been illustrated by what is known as the ecumenical movement, the history of which we surveyed in depth last week.


And the principal dogma of the ecumenical movement of the 20th century was that anyone who called themselves a Christian was to be regarded as a Christian. It didn’t matter if they were a theological liberal who denied the bodily resurrection of Christ or penal substitutionary atonement, or if they were a Roman Catholic who denied the Gospel of justification by faith alone. The important thing was that those who called themselves Christians, and held somewhat to a “Christian” view of morality, were able to unite together in order to show strength in numbers, and therefore to compete in the culture wars for larger societal influence. Whether it was…

Rahab and Kinism - Part 2

Posted at Design of Providence:

Introduction

This is the second part in a brief series on Kinist claims regarding the ethnic identity of Rahab. In this section, we will be responding to an article entitled Kinist Orthodoxy: A Response to Brian Schwertley, Part 4, which is written by David Carlton. Although it touches on various Biblical personalities, it also speaks on the same subject as the previous article we looked at (that is, whether or not Rahab was a Gentile). However, it makes different arguments, mostly due to this particular article being in and of itself a response to someone else. Nonetheless, because this may be an issue a brother or sister in Christ will have to tackle, it will be worth confronting.

If anyone is reading this before the first part, I suggest reading that blog post first. At the beginning of that post, I define Kinism and the various levels of it; I also deal with certain arguments throughout the post that will be referenced here. As before, all quotations f…

John Adams on the Christian Origin of America

Posted at Christian Heritage Fellowship:



"Tragically, many Christians have taken up the siren song of secularists, and against the avalanche of private and public documents have conceded to the enemies of truth that America’s Founding Fathers were deists—or more specifically were completely irreligious. But, in fact the Founding Fathers have bequeathed thousands of documents to their descendants demonstrating they were not deists, atheists, or agnostics. Rather, they have left a ringing testimony of their Christian commitments—as individuals and en masse."
The attack against the Christian origin of America began in earnest in the late 1940s in the Supreme Court decision of Everson VS Board of Education (1947). In the late nineteenth century, liberalizing influences driven by Darwinian philosophy jettisoned historic American legal studies in law schools throughout America, that—prior to this time period—had faithfully remembered the Christian influence upon America and its laws…

The Gospel Coalition and a Children’s Book about Homosexuality

By Shawn Mathis - Posted at Pastor Mathis:



” ‘One more thing,’ he said. ‘No more Mr. McLeod. I’m your uncle now…I married your uncle, so I’m your other uncle.’ ”  “Then my uncles turned to go, off into the blurry afternoon, looking good.”
This excerpt from The Best Man demonstrates the pedestrian manner in which homosexuality is integrated into the narrative of young adult books.

The book is a story about a young preteen boy (Archer) and the men in his life: father, grandfather, Uncle Paul and a school teacher, Mr. McLeod. Oddly, The Gospel Coalition recently reviewed the book. More specifically, the same-sex attracted, celibate Sam Allberry wrote the review.

Now, if you have read my prior two essays, you may assume that I have evidence that The Gospel Coalition (TGC) is endorsing homosexual books. That is not the case.

There is no endorsement of the book. In fact, Allberry frankly acknowledges the problem with the book:

“It doesn’t read like a Stonewall tract disguised as a children’…

Former Benedictine Monk Reflects Upon Rod Dreher’s “The Benedict Option”

Posted at Heart and Mouth:

[The following is a guest post by David Bancz, a Welshman and former Benedictine monk. The post, while quite self-explanatory, is primarily a reflection on Rod Dreher’s book The Benedict Option, but is also a beautiful contrast to the series of posts by Paul Liberati earlier this year, “Reformed Seminarian Converts to Roman Catholicism”. Lord willing, Paul will have his own forthcoming reflections on this wonderful example of God’s grace on behalf of His Children.]


What should repentance look like? In particular, what should repentance from a system of false belief look like? I ask because for roughly 20 years I was not only an enthusiastic Roman Catholic, but one who was convinced that he had a vocation in the Church. In 2006 I joined a Benedictine monastery in the UK and progressed through the various levels of formation and vows. Purely by the gracious action of God, I was liberated from the cloister in 2014 and was consequently freed from the Roman sacrame…

A platform for porn and a dialogue with the devil

By Jordan Standridge - Posted at The Cripplegate:

A few years ago my wife and I were invited to what was being called “The Great Porn Debate.” A Christian man who was anti-porn was going around the country with a famous porn actor and they were debating the question: Is porn harmful or helpful? They were debating this on college campuses, but the meeting we were invited to was in a church—a large church in San Diego where thousands of Christians would be exposed to a man who was going to try to convince the crowd that porn can be good for you and your marriage.

Needless to say, we declined — a decision for which I was subject to ridicule. I was called a Pharisee, and also I was mocked for being “afraid” to hear inappropriate language.

It did make me wonder, though: Should Christians allow debates like these to occur in our churches? Should we expose our congregations to worldly thinking and allow people to come in and attempt to convince our loved ones that the Bible is wrong, or that…

High court backs church in public benefits case

By Tom Strode - Posted at Baptist Press:

WASHINGTON (BP) -- The U.S. Supreme Court struck a blow Monday (June 26) for the freedom of churches to participate in government programs with secular purposes.

Seven of the high court's nine justices agreed the state of Missouri violated a church's right to exercise its faith freely by barring it from participating in a government-run, playground-resurfacing program. In its opinion, the court said excluding Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia "from a public benefit for which it is otherwise qualified, solely because it is a church, is odious" to the U.S. Constitution

Religious freedom advocates applauded the ruling.
Read more here.

Spiritual Disciplines of the Christian Life: Public Worship

By Rev. Ryan Barnhill - Posted at Reformed Free Publishing Association:

"My purpose is not to elaborate on the principles and elements of worship; many fine articles, pamphlets, and sermons can be consulted for that. Rather, I will make only a few brief points that touch on worship as a spiritual discipline."
The final spiritual discipline of the Christian life we consider together is public, corporate worship. By public worship is meant the gathering of believers and their seed in church, on Sunday (or during the week for a special service), to meet with God and give him the honor due to his name. This worship is the meeting of God with his people in covenant fellowship, the purpose of which is to give glory to God for who he is and what he has done in Jesus Christ.

Sadly, the public worship of God in the church world has become largely optional. Attendance at worship services has dropped off. The elderly who come to church scan the auditorium with grief as they note the absen…

Matthew Thornton: His Epitaph was “An Honest Man”

Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History:

He was the fifty-fifth delegate to sign the Declaration of Independence, even though he signed the historic document three months after July 4, 1776. He was a Presbyterian, and a faithful member of the Presbyterian Church of Londonderry, New Hampshire. He was in local, state, and Federal governments, serving his fellow citizens. But beyond all these kudos, it was said that he was “consistent and zealous Christian.” He was Matthew Thornton.

Born in Ireland of Scottish ancestry, from the northern Ireland Protestant section of that country, Matthew Thornton was brought to this country by his parents at the age of three. Settling in what later on became Maine, God’s providence preserved them from hostile Indian attacks. Once, his parents and Matthew had to flee a burning cabin to save their lives. They all moved to Worcester, Massachusetts. Later they moved to Londonderry, New Hampshire in 1740, where Matthew would live for the next fou…

Ecumenical vs. Evangelical

By Mike Riccardi - Posted at The Cripplegate:

One of the most devastating attacks on the life and health of the church throughout all of church history has been what is known as the ecumenical movement—the downplaying of doctrine in order to foster partnership in ministry between (a) genuine Christians and (b) people who were willing to call themselves Christians but who rejected fundamental Christian doctrines.

In the latter half of the 19th century, theological liberalism fundamentally redefined what it meant to be a Christian. It had nothing to do, they said, with believing in doctrine. It didn’t matter if you believed in an inerrant Bible; the scholarship of the day had debunked that! It didn’t matter if you believed in the virgin birth and the deity of Christ; modern science disproved that! It didn’t matter if you embraced penal substitutionary atonement; blood sacrifice and a wrathful God are just primitive and obscene, and besides, man is not fundamentally sinful but basically …

The Rebel’s High Priest

Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History:

On this day of June 23, 1780, an American Revolutionary Battle took place in Springfield, New Jersey. Ordinarily we might think that this has no place in a historical devotional, but it does, because of the presence of the Rev. James Caldwell, pastor of the Elizabethtown Presbyterian Church.

Rev Caldwell was known as “the Rebel’s High Priest.” His congregation in present day Elizabeth, New Jersey, had provided forty line officers to the American Continental army. And Caldwell himself was the chaplain of Col. Elias Dayton’s Regiment in George Washington’s army.

Read more here.

Political Violence and Political Rhetoric in a Divided Nation

By Shane Vander Hart - Posted at Caffeinated Thoughts:


Published 6.15.2017

When James Hodgkinson attacked the Republican practice for today’s Congressional Baseball Game wounding House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) and three others, it was evident his attack was politically motivated.

Hodgkinson volunteered for the Bernie Sanders campaign, and he also was a supporter fo the Southern Poverty Law Center and before firing on the Republican team made up of members of Congress he asked if the group was Republican or Democrat.

Some on the right want to pin the blame on SPLC and Sanders.

They are no more responsible for yesterday’s attack than pro-life groups are when abortionists are targeted, or Sarah Palin was when former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot (some on the left blamed her because of Sarah PAC’s map of targeted congressional races with cross hairs).
Read more here.

Rev. Hezekiah James Balch: Unwavering Devotion to Christ and Country

By David T. Myers - Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History:

Here and there in these posts, you have read about Presbyterian clergy who were instrumental in preparing and molding the popular minds of Americans for the great struggle of the American Revolution. From both pulpit and battle field worship service, these Presbyterian chaplains challenged the troops to fight for their freedom and win the day. The British were certainly aware of the tremendous influences of these clergy toward that end and viewed it with alarm that it was thrown into the side of the rebellion. Among the many pastors of all denominations who joined the ranks were Presbyterians such as the Reverend Hezekiah James Balch, who is our character study today.

Born in 1741 in Deer Creek, Hartford County, Maryland to Col. James Balch and Anne Goodwin, there is little known about his early years. The whole family moved south to Mecklenburg, North Carolina when he was young. At some time in his teens, due to a recomm…

Does The Gospel Coalition Believe in the Heinousness of Homosexuality?

By Shawn Mathis - Posted at Pastor Mathis:

Published 6.14.2017

(This is part of a multi-part series investigating the subtle changes in conservative views on homosexuality. Part one here)

The promotion of Sam Allberry by The Gospel Coalition (TGC) is disconcerting.

It is disconcerting because of what Allbery teaches. And an investigation into those public teachings in turn brings up an important question about TGC’s promotion of this man: does The Gospel Coalition believe in the heinousness of homosexuality?

Allberry’s book, Is God Anti-Gay, was published in 2013. The book was warmly reviewed at TGC’s website and promoted far and wide with glowing endorsements from other respectable Reformed leaders. Allberry is an editor at TCG. Meanwhile, Allberry’s speaking engagements spread and his 2017 video clip came across my facebook feed:

“I am same-sex attracted and have been my entire life. By that I mean that I have sexual, romantic and deep emotional attractions to people of the same sex. …

5 Ways Spurgeon Coped with London’s Terror Attacks

By Christian George - Posted at The Spurgeon Center:

Published 6.19.2017

On September 30, 1888, “Jack the Ripper” murdered his third victim, Elizabeth Stride, only five miles from last Sunday’s terrorist attack in Finsbury Park.

Terror seized Spurgeon’s London. Would the murders continue? Who would die next? (Catherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly)

The following morning, Spurgeon addressed Jack the Ripper’s murder of Elizabeth Stride in his opening prayer at the Metropolitan Tabernacle:
“We hear startling news of abounding sin in this great city. Oh! God, put an end to this, and grant that we may hear no more of such deeds. Let Thy Gospel permeate the city and let no monsters in human form escape Thee.”Read more here. 

Christianity is, Again, the Uniting Factor to Political Tragedy

By Jake MacAulay - Posted at The American View:

Published 6.20.2017


Alexandria, Virginia, became the site of a recent horrific shooting, where an avowed socialist man who hated the foundational governing philosophy of America opened fire at a Republican congressional baseball practice, seriously injuring Representative Steve Scalise of Lousiana, and wounding a total of 4 individuals.

The gunman had a “kill list” in his possession, reportedly having three members of Congress on it – all on the “Freedom Caucus” of conservative Republicans.

Rather than retaliation against differing political parties Republican and Democrat members of Congress kneeled at the second base of Washington, D.C.’s Nationals field to pray in a touching dedication to seriously wounded Rep. Steve Scalise during their annual charity baseball game.

The gunman who committed this heinous crime, James T. Hodgkinson, was killed by police after the Wednesday shooting rampage. Having forfeited, as the Constitution states,…

What is 'alt-right' movement? ERLC provides answers

By Diana Chandler - Posted at Baptist Press:

NASHVILLE (BP) -- The alt-right social and political movement is in the spotlight after the Southern Baptist Convention condemned alternative-right white supremacy at its 2017 annual meeting in Phoenix.

What is the alt-right movement?

Many Southern Baptists aren't familiar with the term, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC) President Russell Moore said in the June 14 "The Weekly," ERLC's email newsletter on news and opinion from the public square. Speaking from the floor of the annual meeting as a messenger from Grace Church in Nashville, Moore was among those encouraging adoption of the resolution condemning "the anti-Gospel of alt-right white supremacy."

"What I point out is just how dangerous and present the alt-right is," Moore said in The Weekly. "When people recognize what it is that the alt-right believes, … I haven't talked to anyone who doesn't immediately reject that.&…

Applying the Gospel in the Modern World

By Bob McEvoy - Posted at The Salty Scrivener:

Text - Romans 12:14-21 (KJV):

14 Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not.
15 Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
16 Be of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits.
17 Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest in the sight of all men.
18 If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men.
19 Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.
20 Therefore if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink: for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head.
21 Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.


A self explanatory portion of scripture! May God give us grace, that with the help of the Holy Spirit we might be enabled to practice it in our own lives! An elder …

A Presbyterian Church in the Heart of Anglican Virginia

By David T. Myers - Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History:

There is an expression commonly heard yet misunderstood by mostly every citizen today in our land. It is “the separation of church and state.” Most commonly, it is interpreted as American government should not enter into Christian principles and practices ever! In my area, an individual running for office in the county found out that her opponent actually quoted some Scripture in a personal letter. Why, she reasoned in an open letter, this violated his political position, because of the separation of church and state. I trust that the readers of this website understand that when we talk about the separation of church and state, we simply mean, as our forefathers understood, there is no such entity as a state church. And yet while that is true, it was not recognized to be true until 1786 in Virginia, eleven years after the American Revolution.

When Presbyterians entered Virginia, “the Church of England (Anglican) was the o…

Social Constructionism (4)

By Rick Mingerink - Posted at Reformed Free Publishing Association:

There is a section in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers I enjoy. A little lapse into this story may prove instructive. The section I’m referring to is the Battle of the Hornburg. The forces of the malevolent wizard Saruman have gathered before the great Hornburg fortress of King Theoden at Helm’s Deep. Seeking safety behind these great walls are the good people of Rohan. At first, the evil orcs and the Uruk-hai take a head on frontal assault. Thousands launch themselves against the mighty fortress, but the great wall at Helm’s Deep is impenetrable. A small remnant of soldiers under King Theoden resist the open attacks of the wicked Saruman. But soon Saruman changes tactics. He knows destroying the great fortress is key to overcoming them. He learns about a vulnerable spot in the wall. He sends a soldier with a bomb strapped to him to run headlong into a small culvert at the base of the wall which al…

FOR THE FUTURE GENERATIONS

Posted at The Darling Princess:

Behaving in such a way as to prepare and preserve the future for the next generations seems like a forgotten concept. Duty and sacrifice are not the norm in our culture. I think it was in our history, or we wouldn’t have had a Revolutionary War. Men of renown pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to ensure a free nation.

I was a child in the late 60s and 70s. It was a tumultuous time for many, maybe even most people. The draft was a big impact on me. My father was a draft dodger. He was gone for months, but unlike the servicemen, he sculked around when he was home. He was had no sense of duty to anyone. Some men came back injured, mentally and or physically, but they had done their duty. Progressive college professors turned the youth against them after a while and there was a shame in war. I don’t advocate for war and I know that the wars of that time were wrought with injustice, as is the case always.

During that same period in our h…

SBC denounces 'alt-right white supremacy'

By Tom Strode - Posted at Baptist Press:



PHOENIX (BP) -- Messengers to the 2017 Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting denounced "alt-right white supremacy" in a nearly unanimous vote Wednesday (June 14) after a tumultuous day of refusing to address the issue.

It appeared maybe fewer than 10 messengers in the Phoenix Convention Center hall voted in the afternoon session against a resolution on "the anti-gospel of alt-right white supremacy." The "alt-right," a movement that advocates white nationalism, has gained increasing attention in the last 18 months.

The action came after a wave of protests on social media from black and white Southern Baptists and other evangelical Christians greeted the failure Tuesday of the Resolutions Committee and messengers to bring an "alt-right" resolution to the floor.

The Resolutions Committee asked Tuesday evening for an opportunity to bring such a resolution to the convention Wednesday, and the Committee on Or…

A brief history of Flag Day

Posted at Constitution Daily:

Flag Day is celebrated in America on June 14, commemorating the day the first flag resolution was passed.

On June 14, 1777, less than one year after Betsy Ross had received the order from General Washington to make the first flag, the Second Continental Congress passed a flag resolution stating:

Resolved, That the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation.
The first national observance of Flag Day was on June 14, 1877; 100 years after the flag resolution was adopted by the Continental Congress.
Read more here.

Rahab and Kinism - Part 1

Posted at Design of Providence:

Introduction

A Kinist argument I've come across recently is that Rahab was not a Canaanite, but one of Hebrew lineage (or, at the very least, a close kinswoman of the Hebrews genetically.) This is most expressly outlined in the online article Rahab the Hebrew: The Royal Genealogy Vindicated, written by Ehud Would. In this article, it is argued that Rahab is actually a close kinsman to the Hebrews, rather than a Canaanite or Gentile. It is likewise argued that Christ being one of mixed genetics would have invalidated His Messianic status, and given credence to His enemies.

Before we begin, let's offer some definitions regarding Kinism and its beliefs.

Kinism, simply defined, is a belief that Christians should emphasize ethnic and racial differences between people, and that a Christian is not at fault for having a preference for one's own people and culture over another. From one Kinist source:
The universal beliefs among Kinists are a recogniti…

Two Responses to James Comey and the UK Election

By Jim Denison - Posted at Christian Headlines:

Publication date: June 9, 2017

Former FBI Director James Comey testified for nearly three hours yesterday before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. My wife and I listened to the entire session. Meanwhile, British citizens were casting votes in an election to determine their leader as they begin the process of exiting the European Union (the so-called “Brexit”).

In light of these historic events, consider two biblical principles.

One: The future is impossible to predict.

On this day a year ago, Hillary Clinton led Donald Trump by six points in nationwide polling. At the same point, Brexit polls showed that those who wanted to stay in the EU led those who wanted to leave by two points; just prior to the June 23 vote, “stay” led by six points.

Read more here.

Saving Lies: Schindler and the Hebrew Midwives

By Clint Archer - Posted at The Cripplegate:

Steven Spielberg’s masterpiece motion picture, Schindler’s List, is a true-life chronicle of the German Nazi, Oskar Schindler, who used his connections with the Nazi regime in the Second World War to preserve the lives of hundreds of Jewish prisoners. When Hitler set his unstable mind on the annihilation of the Jews he had them sent to concentration camps where the prisoners did hard labor until they were executed en masse in gas chambers.

Schindler, even as a Nazi himself, grew to find this reprehensible. But he couldn’t just come out and say so. To resist Herr Hitler was to risk finding yourself in a concentration camp, or dead.

So, Schindler used his entrepreneurial acumen as a ruse to save the lives of the condemned Jews. He procured a steelworks factory that had formerly produced pots and pans and converted it into a munitions factory, cranking out countless casings for bullets and bombs.

He then “convinced” the Nazis (i.e. bribed them…

FOR GOD AND COUNTRY: THE INTELLIGENCE ROLE OF THE REV. JOHN VARDILL

By Ken Daigler - Posted at the Journal of the American Revolution:

On September 26, 1776, the Continental Congress appointed an official Commission to France. Itwas composed of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane and Arthur Lee. The Paris Commission, America’s first diplomatic mission abroad, opened in late December of 1776. Franklin was its de facto head of mission, and it was located in the Hotel de Valentinois, in the Paris suburb of Passy.

Obviously, its personnel, and its mission of seeking French assistance and eventual formal alliance, were of significant interest to the British Government and its intelligence organizations. In France, British intelligence collection was directed by Lord Stormont, its Ambassador to the French Government, and its capabilities were extensive. For most of the war Britain had the Commission thoroughly penetrated with reporting agents, including the Commission’s private secretary Dr. Edward Bancroft.[1]

Where the Reverent John Vardill comes into the pict…

Social Constructionism (3)

By Pastor Rick Mingerink, - Posted at Reformed Free Publishing Association:
We are living in a transition period. For those of us who live in America, think about the deep changes that have taken place in the last decade. Some of these changes are specific to Americans, but often they represent changes experienced across the globe. We may be surprised to be reminded of the following:

In 2000, California approved Proposition 22 which restricted marriage to one man and one woman. This passed by 61% of voters supporting the bill! Even the majority in Los Angeles county approved the measure. Would they do the same in 2017?In 1960, over 70% of Americans identified themselves as Protestant Christians. In 2000, it dropped to 52%. Today, only 37% of Americans identify as a Protestant Christian. (Gallup poll)Throughout human history, mothers were the primary care givers of their children. Today, mothers are the sole or primary breadwinner in 40% of American families with children under age 18. …

China: Church torn apart by abuse pens letter describing persecution

Posted at China Aid:

(Guiyang, Guizhou—June 9, 2017) Splintered into small congregations meeting secretively in the homes of fellow church attendees, the members of a house church in China’s southern Guizhou province penned a letter describing how government persecution obliterated their finances, imprisoned and tortured their leaders, and fractured their thriving church body.

Beginning with the church’s founding, the members of Huoshi Church traced its entire history with the government, insisting that the Communist Party abused them despite their attempts to comply with the law, which included reporting on all of their activities to the local religious affairs and public security bureaus. As the church quickly swelled into the largest house church in Guizhou’s capital, Guiyang, officials told the church it must join the China’s state-run Three-Self Church, which is subject to government censorship, or they would be banned. The members refused.

According to the letter, “From then on, t…

Christian marginalisation in North America

Posted at The Christian Institute:

Christian families that refuse to promote LGBT ideology within the home are under threat from separate measures announced in Canada and the US.

In Ontario, a Bill was passed which critics say will rule out parents who oppose gender ideology for adoption and fostering for not providing a home ‘in the best interests of the child’.

And in the US, training in “LGBTQ competency” has become a mandatory requirement for employees of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS).
Read more here.

Don’t Become a Hobbit! (Unless God calls you to)

By Rutledge Etheridge - Posted at Gentle Reformation:

In times of significant cultural upheaval, it’s common and eminently understandable to seek whatever stability and calm we can find within our lives and to do some good soul searching about the way we’ve chosen to structure them. Are we contributing or perhaps even capitulating to the nervous, noisy way of life we see all around us? In a cultural moment tyrannized by all things digital and overloaded with a constant bombardment of information, so much of it shallow-minded if not salacious, have we neglected a simpler, more richly satisfying and God-honoring way of life? Have we unknowingly – or perhaps knowingly! – imbibed the fuss and fury of a fallen world put on fast forward? These are important questions to consider, and I’m afraid certain trends among Christians are offering overly simplistic answers in their worthy quest for a simple life filled with spiritual substance.

This piece will not be a critique of any particular…

The Faceless Face Book: Blessing or Curse?

By Rev. Dr. Paul Michael Raymond - Posted at New Geneva Ambassador School Blog:

The original intent of Face Book (FB) was primarily meant to bring family and friends together who were separated geographically. Almost immediately FB became a vehicle for everyone who simply wanted to share information or certain life events within their realm of relationships. That sharing expanded to the public arena whether the viewers were friends or not. By the use of textual comments, photos, videos and a variety of “fun” communications FB became an international phenomena.
FB has now metamorphasized into many things, some of which boarder on voyeurism and self idolatry. The FB culture has succeeded in manufacturing a cultic following some of which have become so dissatisfied with their life that they have decided to live through the seemingly exciting life and experiences of others. From the traveling exploits to the mundane “Here is what I am having for dinner tonight” (as if anyone really care…

Remembering D-Day: My World War II Experiences in the Navy

By Clifford Reeves - Posted at Wisconsin Christian News:

Editor’s Note: Clifford Reeves passed away April 6, 2015 at age 89. The following memoirs were read during his funeral service, a poignant reminder of that “Greatest Generation” of American heroes.

My military experience began at Great Lakes Naval Training Station, and went as follows...

After being logged in and given a serial number that would be our permanent identification number, we were immediately sent to get our first haircut. The barbers were friendly and asked what kind of a cut we would like -- after they ran the clippers down the center of our heads.

Next we were assembled in a large room where we were told to take off all our civilian clothes that we arrived in and put them in a box to send them home in. There we were, naked as a jay bird, when the commanding officer told us to line up for a physical, and I mean physical.

They checked places I didn’t even know I had. After that we were issued our Navy uniforms. Fr…

Two Ways to React When Death Comes

By Jordan Standridge - Posted at The Cripplegate:

My buddy’s dad died a few days ago. He was a wonderful dad, husband, and grandfather. As I gave my friend a ride to the airport, I was reminded yet again of a simple truth that will never get old–when Christians die, it is an upgrade and a blessing to see. Not only do they spend eternity in Heaven, but the believing family that they leave behind can be such an encouragement to the church.

My friend’s father died suddenly in his sleep, and the cause is still unknown. Earlier that day, he had gone to get a physical that was needed for his job–which he passed–and yet, at 69 years old, he died in his sleep that very night. Of course, my friend’s was probably still in shock as I drove him to the airport, but you could already tell that he was going to use this trial for God’s glory. He was thinking very clearly, he was focused on others, and he was already thinking biblically about the situation. There was very little for me to do other than…

America the Beautiful?

By David Luepke - Posted at Wisconsin Christian News:

Some calendars will show the sixth of June as D-Day to commemorate the invasion of France by America and it’s allies on June sixth of 1944. That incredible day was the beginning of the end of Hitler’s evil attempt to control the world.

One definition of D-Day says it is nothing more than a code used by the military, but many people have used it to stand for “DECISION Day,” and that’s not a bad idea, because in 1944 Americans made a DECISION to stand against evil.

Many thousands of Americans paid a price for that decision and many paid with their lives. In all, a total of 9,387 of them lie in a cemetery overlooking Normandy Beach and there are many many more who sacrificed their lives, and we have to ask, for what?

It is a well established fact that we were a Nation under God and totally understood the meaning of Psalm 33:12, “Blessed is the Nation whose God is the Lord.”

So how did we get to the point where so many peopl…